Recipe

Cauliflower ‘couscous’ with roasted carrot hummus

Enjoy a delicious, healthy meal tonight with this cauliflower ‘couscous’ with roasted carrot hummus - full of rich, wholesome flavour.

  • 10 mins preparation
  • 45 mins cooking
  • Serves 4
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Ingredients

Roasted carrot hummus
  • 3 medium carrots (360g), chopped coarsely
  • 2 teaspoon olive oil
  • 300 gram hummus
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated orange rind
Cauliflower ‘couscous’ with roasted carrot hummus
  • 900 gram cauliflower, trimmed, chopped coarsely
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 1/3 cup (45g) coarsely chopped, roasted unsalted pistachios
  • 1/3 cup (50g) roasted pine nuts
  • 1/2 cup (100g) pomegranate seeds
  • 1 cup fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves, chopped coarsely
  • 1 cup fresh mint leaves, chopped coarsely
  • 1/2 cup (60g) inca berries (see notes)
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped preserved lemon rind
  • 1 medium lemon (140g), cut into wedges

Method

Cauliflower ‘couscous’ with roasted carrot hummus
  • 1
    Make roasted carrot hummus: Preheat oven to 180°C. Place carrots on a baking-paper-lined oven tray; drizzle with oil. Roast for 40 minutes or until tender; cool slightly.
  • 2
    Blend or process carrots with remaining ingredients until smooth and combined. Season to taste.
  • 3
    Meanwhile, process cauliflower until it resembles couscous. Heat oil in a large frying pan or wok over medium heat; cook cauliflower, stirring, for 5 minutes or until tender.
  • 4
    Add cumin and cardamom; cook for 1 minute or until fragrant, season to taste.
  • 5
    Combine cauliflower mixture, nuts, seeds, parsley, mint, berries and preserved lemon in a large bowl. Serve topped with hummus and lemon wedges.

Notes

Inca berries are dried physalis peruviana or, as they are also known, cape gooseberries. The dried fruit is marketed under various names: Pichuberry in America and goldenberry in England. The fresh orange fruit, which is the size of a cherry tomato, is contained in a green paper-like calyx. The dried fruit has a tangy citrus-like taste, is high in protein (for a fruit), fibre and high in antioxidants. If you can’t find them, use dried cranberries instead or 1 medium orange, peeled and segmented.

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