Recipe

The green turkey burger

Take this delicious lettuce wrapped burger to the next step and veg it up! Replace turkey patties with pan-fried haloumi or fried flat mushrooms.

  • Serves 6
  • 30 mins preparation
  • 15 mins cooking
The green turkey burger

Ingredients

The green turkey burger
  • 1/3 cup (25g) quinoa flakes
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) milk
  • 1 small zucchini (90g), grated coarsely
  • 1 small purple carrot (70g), grated coarsely
  • 1 small red onion (100g), grated coarsely
  • 400 gram minced (ground) free-range turkey or chicken
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 small kumara (250g), cut into 1cm rounds
  • 12 large_piece iceberg lettuce leaves, cut into 10cm rounds
  • 1 large tomato (220g), sliced thinly
  • 1 small red onion (100g), extra, sliced thinly
Green tahini
  • 1/4 cup (70g) tahini
  • 2 tablespoon fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 2 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 clove small garlic, crushed

Method

The green turkey burger
  • 1
    To make green tahini; process ingredients until smooth; season to taste.
  • 2
    Combine quinoa flakes and milk in a small bowl; stand for 10 minutes.
  • 3
    Combine zucchini, carrot, onion, turkey, parsley and quinoa mixture in a medium bowl; season to taste using damp hands, shape turkey mixture into six 8cm patties; cover, refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  • 4
    Heat half the oil in a large non-stick frying pan over low heat; cook kumara, turning, for 8 minutes or until tender.
  • 5
    Heat remaining oil over medium heat; cook patties, for 4 minutes each side or until golden and cooked through.
  • 6
    Top six lettuce rounds with patties, tomato, extra onion and kumara. drizzle with green tahini; top with remaining lettuce rounds. Serve immediately.

Notes

You will need about 1 or 2 iceberg lettuce, depending on their size. Carrots were originally purple, before the 17th century and the dutch bred an orange strain. Purple carrots boast beta-carotene and vitamin a, like their orange cousins and additionally carry the purple-coloured pigment, anthocyanin, an antioxidant said to act as an anti-inflammatory.

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